7 Best Printers that Print on Canvas in 2022

By Iva Mikles •  Updated: Aug 24, 2022 •  Guides

If you want your photo and art prints to evoke the ultimate artistic feel of an original, you will enjoy printing on canvas at home or in your studio. The canvas medium’s beautiful texture brings this instant sense of prestige associated with oil paintings and galleries.

Printing your artwork and photographs on canvas yourself also gives you greater control and flexibility. You are free to experiment with different canvas types and color profiles. And you can ship your prints to customers much faster and with a more personal touch.

To save you hours of research, in this article, you will find my selection of the best printers that can print on canvas. It is based on my research, tests, and the experience of my artist and photographer friends. You will also learn what your options are in terms of inkjet canvas types and post-print finishes. So keep on reading!

💡 Please note: We are supported by our readers. When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you! For more info, please read our disclosure.

Top 4 Printers for Canvas Printing Compared

This is a quick comparison of my favorite printers that print on canvas. Find more picks in the overview below, including Canon, eco-friendly and dye-based printers.

My Pick
Budget Pick
Studio Pick
Large Format Pick
Description:

For artists and photographers who want the best price-value canvas printing experience

Description:

For artists and photographers on a budget

Description:

For artists and photographers with a steady business selling art and photo prints.

Description:

For artists and photographers with a steady business who want to sell large format art and photo prints

Colors:
10-color pigment-based ink system
Colors:
6-color dye-based ink system
Colors:
10-color pigment-based ink system
Colors:
11-color pigment-based ink system
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 50mil (1.3mm) Roll feed: 20mil (0.5mm)
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 23mil (0.6mm)
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 60mil (1.5mm) Roll feed: 20mil (0.5mm)
Max paper thickness:
Manual/Roll feed: 31.5mil (0.8mm)
Roll Feed:
Yes (integrated)
Roll Feed:
N/A
Roll Feed:
Yes (roll media adapter)
Roll Feed:
Yes (integrated)
Paper sizes:
3.5″×5″ to 13″×19″ / A3+ (user definable length + roll paper adapter allows for panoramic prints)
Paper sizes:
4″×6″ to 13″×19″ / A3+ (user definable length)
Paper sizes:
3.5″×5″ to 17″×22″ / A2+ (user definable length + roll paper adapter allows for panoramic prints)
Paper sizes:
6″ to 24″ width; max 59″ (roll) & 63″ (sheet) length
Borderless printing:
3.5″×5″ to 13″×19″ / A3+
Borderless printing:
4″×6″ to 13″×19″ / A3+
Borderless printing:
3.5″×5″ to 17″×22″ / A2+
Borderless printing:
6″ to 24″ width; max 59″ (roll) & 63″ (sheet) length
My Pick
Description:

For artists and photographers who want the best price-value canvas printing experience

Colors:
10-color pigment-based ink system
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 50mil (1.3mm) Roll feed: 20mil (0.5mm)
Roll Feed:
Yes (integrated)
Paper sizes:
3.5″×5″ to 13″×19″ / A3+ (user definable length + roll paper adapter allows for panoramic prints)
Borderless printing:
3.5″×5″ to 13″×19″ / A3+
Budget Pick
Description:

For artists and photographers on a budget

Colors:
6-color dye-based ink system
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 23mil (0.6mm)
Roll Feed:
N/A
Paper sizes:
4″×6″ to 13″×19″ / A3+ (user definable length)
Borderless printing:
4″×6″ to 13″×19″ / A3+
Studio Pick
Description:

For artists and photographers with a steady business selling art and photo prints.

Colors:
10-color pigment-based ink system
Max paper thickness:
Manual feed: 60mil (1.5mm) Roll feed: 20mil (0.5mm)
Roll Feed:
Yes (roll media adapter)
Paper sizes:
3.5″×5″ to 17″×22″ / A2+ (user definable length + roll paper adapter allows for panoramic prints)
Borderless printing:
3.5″×5″ to 17″×22″ / A2+
Large Format Pick
Description:

For artists and photographers with a steady business who want to sell large format art and photo prints

Colors:
11-color pigment-based ink system
Max paper thickness:
Manual/Roll feed: 31.5mil (0.8mm)
Roll Feed:
Yes (integrated)
Paper sizes:
6″ to 24″ width; max 59″ (roll) & 63″ (sheet) length
Borderless printing:
6″ to 24″ width; max 59″ (roll) & 63″ (sheet) length

Table of Content

Overview: 7 Best Home and Studio Canvas Printers

My Pick: Epson SureColor P700

My Pick
Epson SureColor P700 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

My Pick for Art Prints, Canvas, Cardstock, Stickers, Vinyl, and Transfer paper

10-color pigment-based ink system :: 5760×1440 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 13″×19″ (A3+) :: Max paper thickness: 50mil (1.3mm) :: Integrated roll feed :: Early 2020 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Wider version: SureColor P900 17″ Inkjet Color Printer

Get it on Amazon

Why it’s my pick – Epson SureColor P700 is my pick for the best canvas printer because it supports thick canvas and can reproduce colors exceptionally well.

Pros & Cons of Epson SureColor P700 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ Excellent price-value experience➖ Inks cost
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ Size and weight
➕ 10-color archival pigment-based ink system
➕ Exceptional color accuracy
➕ Outstanding print quality
➕ Integrated roll feed
➕ Plenty of ICC profiles available

Epson SureColor P700 Specifications

Epson SureColor P700 is the successor of the popular P600 model discontinued in 2020. 

P700 features all the newest printing advances, like dedicated matte black and photo black ink to avoid depleting ink switching for glossy and matte paper. Wider color gamut to reproduce the colors more accurately and the long-lasting prints (which, honestly, Epson has been known forever !?).

Integrated roll feed supporting canvas rolls makes it my choice for the top pick.

Also Great: Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300

Also Great
Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

Great for Art Prints, Canvas, Cardstock, Stickers, Vinyl, and Transfer paper

10-color pigment-based ink system :: 4800×2400 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 13×19 (A3+) :: Max paper thickness: rear feed 11.8mil (0.3mm); manual feed 23.6mil (0.6mm) :: Late 2020 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 is an excellent printer that I’d choose as my top pick if it weren’t for the missing roll media feed. 

Pros & Cons of Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ Great price-value experience➖ Inks cost
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ No support for roll feed media
➕ 10-color archival pigment-based ink system➖ Size and weight
➕ Outstanding color accuracy and print quality
➕ Many ICC profiles are available

Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 Specifications

If you are a “diehard” Canon fan, you will appreciate Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 as an option. 

It reproduces colors accurately and delivers high-quality canvas prints!

Except for some marginal differences in software and printing technology, it can do everything as well as Epson SureColor P700. The missing roll feed is the only reason I didn’t include it as the top pick for printing on canvas—a fantastic choice for any artist and photographer.

Budget Pick: Epson Expression Photo XP-15000

Budget Pick
Epson Expression XP-15000 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

Budget Pick for Art Prints, Cardstock, Canvas, Stickers, Vinyl, and Transfer paper

6-color dye-based ink system :: 5760×1450 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 13×19 (A3+) :: Max paper thickness: rear feed 23mil (0.6mm) manually :: Late 2017 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – For an affordable photo printer, it supports a wide range of art media, including thick canvas, and can reproduce colors very accurately.

Pros & Cons of Epson Expression Photo XP-15000 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ Affordable price➖ 6-color dye-based inks
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ No support for roll feed media
➕ Accurate colors➖ Less amount of ICC profiles
➕ Great print quality for the price
➕ Inks cost

Epson Expression Photo XP-15000 Specifications

Suppose you are just starting out printing on canvas at home or in your studio and want to test the ins and outs of the creative business. In that case, Epson Expression Photo XP-15000 may be a great choice.

Affordable price, excellent ink system, solid color accuracy, and it supports canvas and other thick media. A no-brainer if you are on the lookout for a cheap canvas printer.

Dye-Based Pick: Canon Pixma PRO-200

My Pick
Canon Pixma PRO-200 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

My Pick for Art Prints, Canvas, Cardstock, Stickers, Vinyl and Transfer paper

8-color dye-based ink system :: 4800×2400 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 13×19 (A3+) :: Max paper thickness: rear feed 11.8mil (0.3mm); manual feed 23.6mil (0.6mm) :: Late 2020 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – Canon Pixma Pro-200 reproduces colors extremely accurately and delivers a fantastic printing experience when printing on glossy polyester inkjet canvas.

Pros & Cons of Canon Pixma PRO-200 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ Great price-value experience➖ Inks cost
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ Dye-based inks
➕ 8-color dye-based ink system➖ No support for roll feed media
➕ Outstanding color accuracy
➕ Many ICC profiles are available

Canon Pixma PRO-200 Specifications

Because of its unique price-value experience,this is my favorite art printer that supports thick canvas and other textured media.

It is a dye-based printer, so it is suitable for canvas prints only under certain conditions.

I especially appreciate it for photo prints on more glossy polyester inkjet canvas.

Eco Pick: Epson EcoTank ET-8550

Eco Pick
Epson EcoTank ET-8550 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

Eco All-in-one Pick for Art Prints, Cardstock, Canvas, Stickers, Vinyl, and Transfer paper

6-color hybrid dye-based & pigment-based ink system :: 5760×1440 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 13×19 (A3+) :: Max paper thickness: rear feed 50mil (1.3mm) manually :: Early 2021 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – As an ink tank printer, it is my eco pick with an impressive yield per ink bottle. In addition, its hybrid pigment and dye-based ink system make it an exciting choice for printing on canvas.  

Pros & Cons of Epson EcoTank ET-8550 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ Eco-friendly➖ Hybrid pigment and dye-based ink system (a relatively new system that needs to earn its worth)
➕ Inks cost➖ No support for roll feed media
➕ Hybrid pigment and dye-based ink system (this can be an advantage as well as a disadvantage)
➕ Supports thick canvas
➕ Great print quality

Epson EcoTank ET-8550 Specifications

Ink tanks, also known as super tank or eco tank printers from Epson, represent the most sustainable and cost-friendly printing solution on the market.

The ET-8550 was created with artists, photographers, and designers in mind, so it supports thick media like canvas and can accurately reproduce the colors.

The hybrid ink set, including both pigment dye-based inks, makes it an interesting option for printing on canvas. 

Art Studio Pick: Epson SureColor P900

Art Studio Pick
Epson SureColor P900 17″ Inkjet Color Printer

Art Studio Pick for Art Prints, Canvas, Cardstock, Stickers, Vinyl, and Transfer paper

10-color pigment-based ink system :: 5760×1440 DPI :: Borderless prints up to 17×22 (A2+) :: Max paper thickness: rear feed 11.8mil (0.3mm); manual feed 60mil (1.5mm) :: Late 2020 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Smaller version: SureColor P700 13″ Inkjet Color Printer

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – I think Epson SureColor P900 is a true art and photography studio pick among all the consumer-grade printers available on the market today.

Pros & Cons of Epson SureColor P900 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ 10-color archival pigment-based ink system➖ Inks cost
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ Roll feed adapter not included in price
➕ Exceptional color accuracy➖ Size and weight
➕ Excellent print quality
➕ Roll feed possible with an adapter
➕ Plenty of ICC profiles available

Epson SureColor P900 Specifications

Epson SureColor P900 is the successor of the P800, which was also discontinued in 2020. 

In terms of technological advances, it mirrors the smaller 13″ model (P700) with dedicated matte and photo black ink to avoid expensive ink switching, a wider color gamut to reproduce the colors more accurately, and the archival quality of the prints. 

P900 delivers exceptional color accuracy and print quality and has plenty of ICC profiles. 

Canvas rolls are supported via the roll feed adapter, making P900 a very interesting wide format printer for art and photography studios!

Large Format Pick: Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 

Large Format Pick
Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 24″ Inkjet Color Printer

Large Format Pick for Art Prints, Photo Prints, and Canvas

11-color pigment-based ink system :: 2400×1200 DPI :: Borderless prints from 6″ to 24″ width; max 59″ (roll) & 63″ (sheet) length :: Max paper thickness: manual/roll feed 31.5mil (0.8mm) :: Integrated roll feed :: Late 2020 model :: Wireless & AirPrint

Get it on Amazon

Why I like it – For a 24″ large format printer, this is a reasonably priced printer that delivers absolutely amazing results every time and is suitable for art and photography studios with stable and scalable business. 

Pros & Cons of Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 as a Canvas Printer

ProsCons
➕ 11-color archival pigment-based ink system➖ Price
➕ Supports thick canvas➖ Size and weight – you need to “check twice” before choosing this printer. It needs about 3-4 people to carry and sometimes barely fits through the doors.
➕ Exceptional color accuracy
➕ Excellent print quality
➕ Integrated Roll feed
➕ Plenty of ICC profiles available

Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 Specifications

We could argue if 24″ printers are suitable for home and studio use. They are already on the verge of becoming commercial printers ideal for printing shops.

Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 is different. I tested it in my friend’s home studio. Before you decide to get it, you really need to “check twice” – space in your studio, the width of your doors 🙂 It takes 3-4 people to carry, and the delivery guy or gall may look at you like, “Are you sure you want this in your home!?”

The answer is, “Heck, yeah!” Ensure you control your revenues and expenses because this printer is quite expensive. 

Besides that, this printer delivers amazing prints consistently and with ease. It is also a much better performer than its competitors from HP and Epson.  

Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-2100 large format canvas printer makes canvas printing very enjoyable. I am sure your customers will be happy to order large canvas reproductions of your artwork and photographs.

If you are a big fan of Epson or HP, here are their 24″ wide format printers you can explore:

Choosing the suitable art medium is equally art and science (pun intended 🙂 ). It involves a lot of variables, such as your artwork, photography style, preferences, goals, and budget, and requires a lot of testing. This can be pretty overwhelming.

So here is a quick overview of a few of my favorite inkjet canvases for home and studio printers to get you going. Below you will find more details about inkjet canvas materials, finishes, and post-print varnishing.

  • Description:

    21mil and bright white, 17″x40′ roll (also available in 24″x40′), Exceptional For Digital Art and Photo Printing. Suitable for Canon, Epson, HP printers

  • Description:

    17″x75′ (also available 24″x75′), 17mil Thickness, Compatible With Most Roll Fed Epson, Canon, and HP Printers

Description:

13″ x 20′, Water and Fade Resistant Archival Inkjet Canvas

Description:

21 mil and bright white. 13″ x 19″, 25 Sheets For Digital Art and Photo Printing. Compatible with Canon, Epson and HP Printers

Description:

21mil and bright white, 17″x40′ roll (also available in 24″x40′), Exceptional For Digital Art and Photo Printing. Suitable for Canon, Epson, HP printers

Description:

17″x75′ (also available 24″x75′), 17mil Thickness, Compatible With Most Roll Fed Epson, Canon, and HP Printers

Description:

Perfect for Epson, Canon, and HP printers, 19mil textured Canvas, 17″x10′ roll (other sizes available)

Description:

21mil, 340gsm 17x40′

Description:

"The canvas of masterpieces" - For Aqueous Inks, Natural, 17″x10′ Roll

Canvas as an art medium has been around since the 16th century, popularized by Venetian artists of the Italian Renaissance. It replaced wood and stone because it was easier to produce and transport and retained the paintings for much longer.

Nowadays, we have different canvas types at our disposal, both for painting the originals and printing the reproductions. The fantastic thing about technological progress is that sometimes the reproductions are indistinguishable from the original! 

This commands higher popularity among customers and, depending on your business, higher margins than other art and photo prints. 

For canvas to work correctly with the modern inkjet technology, it needs to be from slightly different materials. It also requires other surface treatments than the ones we would use for oil or acrylic painting.

So I put together a primer on inkjet canvas materials, types, and post-print treatment with recommendations for the canvases you could purchase.

Inkjet Canvas Materials

Inkjet canvas for sale to the general public will usually be made from these three materials:

Cotton Inkjet Canvas

This inkjet canvas is made from 100% cotton and is the most expensive of the three. It has a nice texture, giving it this premium look and feel. Essentially, it resembles the canvas used for oil and acrylic paintings. 

The drawback of 100% cotton inkjet canvas is that its production method doesn’t guarantee the same color throughout the roll. This makes it less suitable for multiple reproductions or canvas print series.

Oh, and I shouldn’t forget the even more exquisite inkjet canvas – the Belgian Linen. Dubbed as the canvas of masterpieces, this inkjet canvas is very prestigious and expensive. Therefore, it will find use among artists and photographers focusing on affluent customers.

Polyester Inkjet Canvas

100% polyester inkjet canvas is the least expensive of the three. It is smooth, consistent in color, and very popular with photographers printing large-scale photo prints. 

Due to the lack of deep texture, it is less suitable for artwork reproductions because it doesn’t make them look like the original.

Poly-cotton Inkjet Canvas

The polyester and cotton inkjet canvas, also known as poly-cotton blend or mix, was developed to bring the best from both worlds. 

It combines the deep texture of cotton with the color consistency of polyester. It’s usually made in the mix of 60% cotton – 40% polyester or its variations, e.g. 65% cotton – 35% polyester and 70% cotton – 30% polyester. 

Poly-cotton blend inkjet canvases are the most popular choice for art and photo prints among artists and photographers.

Types of Inkjet Canvas Finishes

Besides the materials used for the production, inkjet canvases also come with different base finishes.

Matte

The matte finish is usually the basic finish you will get when you purchase inkjet canvas. It has this natural feel and is known as canvas used for paintings.

The matte texture interacts nicely with the pigment-based inks and ensures the longevity of the print. That’s why it’s great for oil or acrylic painting reproductions and photographs. 

The obvious disadvantage is that the colors can come out dull, which needs to be balanced using post-print coating and varnishing.

Satin

The satin finish adds this subtle shine to the canvas while retaining the texture. It is also very well suited for painting reproductions and photo prints.

Semi-gloss / Luster

The semi-gloss or luster finish is a step up from the satin finish. It delivers a bit more shine, still retaining the texture and the overall feel. It is more suited for photo prints, and some illustrations look lovely on it, too.

Dye-based printers will perform well with this canvas finish, making the colors quite vibrant.

Gloss

The gloss finish is primarily manufactured for eco-solvent printers, and you will not usually find them supporting inkjet printers. Eco-solvent printers are intended for printing on large-scale materials for outdoor use (e.g., banners).

Silver

You will mostly find the silver finish with online and local printers because it’s more like a printing method on its own than the finish.

I wanted to mention it as an option because it can give your artwork, especially illustrations and photographs, this prestigious metallic feel. All the whites come out silver, and all the colors come out metallic. Such canvas prints find their place in modern interior design and offices. 

Post-print Inkjet Canvas Coating & Varnishing

Once the canvas gets printed on canvas, you have a few options for the post-print treatment by using canvas varnishes.

Varnishes prolong the life of your canvas print by protecting it against the UV light that may cause fading, then water damage, cracks, and chips. In some cases, they also enhance the colors, making them more vibrant.

I prefer to paint the varnish on the canvas because I never seem to get the spray distributed evenly!

Below are some recommended varnishes (matte, satin, and gloss) you could try in your process:

Description:

Premium Water-Based Canvas Coating with Fade Protection and No Glare Finish, 1 Gallon

Description:

Premium Canvas Coating, Water Based UV Protection, 100+ Years Certified Archival, 1 Gallon

Description:

Premium Water-Based Canvas Coating with Fade Protection, 100 Years Certified Archival, 1 Quart

Main Criteria for Choosing a Canvas Printer

If you want to print on canvas at home or in a studio, inkjet printers are the only quality option because of their color accuracy. 

Aside from that, you should consider the following criteria when choosing a canvas printer: 

Supported Media Thickness

Like cardstock printing requirements, a printer you want to use to print on canvas must support thick media.

Inkjet canvas, specifically developed for printing, is quite thick. If you don’t count specialty media, like, for example, certain types of boards, the canvas will be pretty much the thickest medium you will put into your printer regularly. 

So you need to ensure you get a printer that can print on thick media; otherwise, you risk jamming the printer and wasting your money and time.

The media thickness is usually measured in “mil” (a thousandth of an inch), “pt” (points), and “mm” (millimeters). There are also “lb” (pounds) and “gsm” (grammage), which represent the media weight. 

When it comes to inkjet canvas, it is labeled on packaging with “mil,” “gsm,” and sometimes “μm” (micrometers). It is usually 19 – 22mil thick with the grammage between 300gsm and 450gsm.

Graphic/Photo: “gsm” and “mil” on inkjet canvas packaging – Source: Amazon.com

Regarding converting the “μm” (micrometers) to “mil,” the 480μm Epson canvas below would be around 19mil thick.

Graphic/Photo: “gsm” and “μm” on inkjet canvas packaging – Source: Amazon.com

Most modern photo inkjet printers support manual media feed up to 60mil thick for sheets and up to 30mil thick for rolls. This is plenty for inkjet canvas! 

💡Pro tip: See my article about cardstock printers to learn about the paper’s weight and thickness.

Supported Media Sizes

Depending on your artistic vision or camera aspect ratio, you will have preferred canvas and photo print sizes. And you want to ensure your new printer will support them. 

When selling your canvas prints to customers, there is a selection of popular sizes. 

This popularity is determined by the sizes sold by canvas and frame manufacturers and canvas printing companies, which follow the most common aspect ratio of 1:1 (square), 3:2, 4:3, 5:4 (rectangle), and 3:1 (panoramic). 

There are many canvas print sizes available, with the most popular being 8″×10″, 11″×14″, 12″×12″, 16″×20″, 24″×36″, and 32″×48″.

Most home and studio photo printers support prints 13″ or 17″ wide and can easily print on small and medium-sized canvases.

Some of the more expensive printers support up to 24″, 44″, and 60″ wide prints. These are, however, considered commercial printers, starting at $3,000 – $3,500 and representing quite an investment.

You should consider this cost if you, let’s say, want to only focus on large and wide prints. Except for the 24″ printers, which still fit through the door, you might be better off printing with an online or a local printer. Don’t forget to ask for print samples and test extensively, so you are satisfied with their work.

💡Pro tip: Don’t limit your reproductions to one size only. Utilize the aspect ratio of your paintings and photographs, e.g., 4:3 = 9″×12″, 12″×16″, 18″×24″, 36″×48″ would mean one image in aspect ratio 4:3 gives you an inventory of four reproductions/prints to sell. Now, that’s what I call a reproduction!! 🙂

Canvas Roll Feed Possibility

This is a matter of your preference, but I discovered that the best quality inkjet canvas usually comes in rolls, not sheets.

Inkjet canvas sheets are fine, and some hidden gems are among them. However, inkjet canvas rolls are much better in flexibility and achieving printing efficiency. 

Among the current 13″ and 17″ photo printers, only Epson supports either integrated or adapter roll media handling. The 24″, and wider, printers have integrated roll media handling out of the box. 

💡Pro tip: Double-check the maximum media core supported by your printer (usually 2″ and/or 3″) so you buy the correct canvas rolls!

Dye-based Inks vs. Pigment-based Inks

Inks used in modern photo inkjet printers intended for home and studio use are dye- or pigment-based inks.

Each has its advantages and disadvantages, which I summarized in the list below:

Pros of Pigment-based Inks

➕ Fine art papers and inkjet canvases are designed for pigment inks

➕ Pigment-based printers have a much wider color gamut (the range of colors they can reproduce)

➕ They last much longer and fade much slower than dye-based inks 

➕ Produce much better vivid black and white prints

Cons of Pigment-based Inks

➖ Pigment-based printers are more expensive and more suitable for artists and photographers with a steady business

Pros of Dye-based Inks

➕ Dye-based printers are cheaper and more affordable for artists and photographers on a budget

➕ Especially on glossy media, they produce vibrant colors that pop

Cons of Dye-based Inks

➖ Generally, they fade faster and last shorter than pigment-based inks. This, however, greatly depends on the medium you use

I prefer the printers with pigment-based inks for printing on canvas because they have better archival quality and perform better with textured matte canvas. 

💡Pro tip: To achieve a vibrant look and gloss, there is always an option to use a special varnish or spray coat on your canvas print.

Printer Color Profiles (ICC Profiles)

Art and photo prints require an elaborate interplay of media and color management.

And when it comes to canvas prints with higher perceived and actual value, they must come out with high color accuracy.

If you are not into technical details, you should ideally get a printer with pre-programmed canvas support as a media type. This will allow you to reproduce the colors on inkjet canvas accurately most of the time.

If you, however, know things or two about color profiles (also known as print profiles or ICC profiles) and monitor calibration, you know that using pre-programmed media types may not deliver the best results. 

That’s why the printer manufacturers usually provide specific color profiles for their printers and their branded media (papers, cardstock, canvas, etc.). For example, almost all modern photo inkjet printers from Canon and Epson have pre-programmed ICC profiles for their canvases. 

In addition, canvas manufacturers or resellers create supporting ICC profiles for their products. And if that’s not enough, some professionals also create custom ICC profiles you can purchase.

9 out of 10 times, it’s not about the printer, but the medium type and the printer color profile. It depends on your preferences for the canvas type; finish and requires a lot of testing.

💡Pro tip: If you want more contrast in your canvas prints, try “perceptual rendering intent” (depending on canvas type and color profile).

FAQs – Best Printer for Canvas

What printer do you need for canvas?

To print on canvas at home or in a studio, you will need an inkjet color printer with either pigment-based or dye-based inks—modern photo inkjet printers, such as Epson SureColor P700 and Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-300 support canvas medium.

Can you put a canvas in a printer?

Yes, you can, depending on the printer you have. For example, inkjet canvas specifically manufactured for canvas printing usually has a thickness of about 19mil to 22mil (0.5mm to 0.55mm). And most modern photo printers support thick media up to 30mil and 60mil. 

How much do canvas printers cost?

Depending on your needs – canvas type, media thickness, and size, the modern inkjet printers suitable for printing on canvas at home or in a studio cost anywhere between $300 to $3,500.

Can Epson printer print on canvas?

Yes, home and studio printers, such as Epson SureColor P700 (13″), Epson EcoTank ET-8550, and Epson SureColor P900 (17″), can print on canvas sheets and canvas rolls.

Can the Canon Pixma Pro 200 print on canvas?

Yes, Canon Pixma PRO-200 can print on canvas sheets up to 23mil (0.6mm) thick.

Conclusion

To finish, here are my recommendations for the best canvas printers on the market today:

Proved by countless galleries and top-selling artists, I think the canvas is the ultimate art medium for reproducing your paintings and printing your photographs. 

Canvas will make your painting reproductions look like originals. Likewise, your photo prints will gain this prestigious feel, suitable for the walls of appreciative customers and galleries. 

Moreover, by printing your art and photographs on a good canvas printer yourself, you benefit from greater flexibility in experimenting with different inkjet canvases, customization, and speed of delivery. You may also make a better profit when comparing the cost of materials and production.

I hope my research has made it easier for you to get a new professional canvas printer! And you will have a lot of success selling high-quality reproductions of your originals or amazingly looking photo prints.

Also, visit my website – Art Side of Life – for other buyer’s guides, online courses, articles, and other resources.

Sources

Other articles in the Printers and Scanners series:

Hi, I am Iva (rhymes with “viva”). I am an artist, illustrator, founder of Art Side of Life®, and Top Teacher on Skillshare. Since 2009 I've worked as an illustrator, character designer, art director, and branding specialist focusing on illustration, storytelling, concepts, and animation. I believe that we are all creative in infinite numbers of ways, so I've made it my mission to teach you everything I know and help either wake up or develop your creative genius. Learn more about me.

Recommended: